English poetry

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The Irish Convict’s Return

The Irish Convict’s Return

Ye mountains and glens of Old Ireland,
I’ve returned home to ye again;
During my absence from ye
My heart always felt great pain.

Oh, how I long’d to see you dear Nora,
And the old folks at home;
And the beautiful Lakes o’ Killarney,
Where we oft together did roam.

Ye beautiful Lakes of Killarney,
Ye are welcome to me again;
I will now reform my character,
And from all bad company refrain.

Oh, how I have long’d to see my old father
And my mother dearer than all;
And my favourite dog Charlie
That wont to come at my call.

Ye green hills and lakes of Old Ireland,
Ye are dearer than life unto me;
Many sleepless nights I have had
Since my banishment from thee.

But to-night I will see the old folks
And my dear Nora too…
And she and I will get married,
And I’m sure we will never rue.

And we may have plenty of children,
And for them I will work like a man.
And I hope Nora and I will live happy,
And do the best we can.

For my own part, I will never grumble,
But try and be content…
And walk in the paths of virtue,
And remember my banishment.

And at night at the fireside with Nora,
I will tell her of my limbs being bound,
And all my great hardships endured,
And how I was lash’d like a hound.

And when my story is ended,
Nora will sympathise with her tears,
Which will help to drown my sorrow,
And help me through coming years.



Poem The Irish Convict’s Return - William Topaz Mcgonagall